1957 Bobby Fischer Newspaper Articles Archive

The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, January 19, 1957 - Page 33

Eastern States Open at Washington
“Hans Berliner, who competed in the Canadian Open, won the Eastern States Open at Washington, 6-1. N. Rossolimo, Bobby Fischer, W. Lombardy and A. Feuerstein tied next with 5½-1½ each. 56 took part. Results were broadcast each day over the Military Affiliate Radio System to the home clubs of the contestants.”

Eastern States Open at Washington

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, January 28, 1957 - Page 29

“The game between Max Pavey, club champion, and Bobby Fischer was postponed.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, February 03, 1957 - Page 160

Shipman Sets Pace
Leading the field of twenty-four with a score of three straight victories in the first section of the championship semi-finals at the Manhattan Chess Club, Walter J. Shipman will meet Arthur Feuerstein in the fourth round this afternoon.
The latter has a score of 2—0 in the same section. Shipman will conduct the black pieces.
Another with a 2—0 score is the United States champion, Arthur B. Bisguier, in Section 3. He will meet Edgar T. McCormick of East Orange, N.J. Bisguier will play the white pieces.
Second highest in the standing with 2½-½, is William Lombardy who will face Raul Benedicto. Thirteen-year-old Bobby Fischer, who postponed his third-round game with Max Pavey last Sunday, will encounter Abe Turner.
Pavey will conduct the white pieces against Karl Vine, who is on even terms with him at 1½-½ in the second group.
By taking the following game Lombardy laid a foundation for a winning score in Section 4:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, February 18, 1957 - Page 35

Pavey Gains In Chess
Beats Fischer to Qualify for Manhattan Club Title Play
Max Pavey, the defending champion, yesterday won his adjourned game from Bobby Fischer, a 13-year-old Brooklyn player, and qualified for title play in the Manhattan Chess Club championship.
Pavey's qualifying score was 4—1. Abe Turner qualified from the section, with 3½—1½. Six others previously had qualified for title play starting next Sunday. The were Arthur B. Bisguier, Walter J. Shipman, Arthur Feuerstein, George Kramer, William Lombardy and Hugh Myers.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

This article also appears in,

The Ithaca Journal Ithaca, New York Thursday, February 21, 1957 - Page 12

Brooklyn Schoolboy Hailed As New Chess Prodigy

Brooklyn Schoolboy Hailed As New Chess Prodigy

Brooklyn Boy, 13, Hailed as 'Brilliant' Chess Player

NEW YORK—(AP)— A quiet group huddled around a table in the corner of the Marshall Chess Club, watching an almost unbelievable game.
The players were Donald Byrne, a chess master, and Bobby Fischer, a 13-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy playing in his first major tournament.
Time and again—with bold, surprising moves—Bobby out-foxed his more experienced opponent.
“Impossible,” whispered one of the onlookers. “Byrne is losing to a 13-year-old nobody,” and the game was over. Bobby had earned his first victory in the Lessing J. Rosenwald Tournament.

* * *

CHESS REVIEW magazine called it the “game of the century—a stunning masterpiece of combination play performed by a boy of 13 against a formidable opponent, matching the finest on record in the history of chess prodigies.”
Bobby didn't win the Rosenwald tournament— the trophy went to Sammy Reshevsky, the ranking U.S. player—but the crew-cut youngster who would rather play chess than eat established himself as a young man to watch.
New York chess enthusiasts have recognized Bobby's ability for several years.
Hans Kmoch, secretary-manager of the Manhattan Chess Club, says:
“For his age, I don't think there is any better chess player in the world. He is a genuine prodigy and one of the best players in our club.”
Bobby appears embarrassed by all the attention he has drawn since he defeated Byrne.
“I just made the moves I thought were best,” he says modestly. “I was just lucky.”
Where did he learn the game?
“My sister taught me when I was 6,” he says. “She was 12 and didn't know too much about the game, but she told me where and how to move the pieces. I liked it and have been playing it ever since.”

* * *

DOES HE WANT to continue playing the game and perhaps become one of the great players?
“I could play chess all my life,” he answers shyly. “I like tournaments and would like to play in a lot of them. As for being great, I don't know about that.”
Kmoch, however has fewer reservations:
“The outlook is brilliant. If he continues to proceed the way he has the past year or two, he's likely to become one of the greatest players of all times.”

Hattiesburg American, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, Friday, February 15, 1957

Brooklyn Schoolboy A Chess Prodigy

Brooklyn Schoolboy A Chess Prodigy

Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Friday, February 22, 1957

Brooklyn Boy, 13, Hailed As 'Brilliant' Chess Player

Brooklyn Boy, 13, Hailed As 'Brilliant' Chess Player

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, February 25, 1957 - Page 32

“Eight tied at 4—2. They were Bobby Fischer, 13-year-old player from Brooklyn; Eliot Hearst, Claude Hillinger and William Lombardy of New York…
Also, Lombardy beat M. Tilles of Baltimore; DeCamillo defeated R. Weinstein of New York; Jones beat R. Friedenthal of Westport, Conn.; Hillinger beat C. Pennington of Westfield, N.J. and Fischer beat J. Goldsmith of New York

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, March 07, 1957 - Page 48

Dr. Euwe to Play Here
The Manhattan Chess Club reported yesterday the arrival of Dr. Max Euwe of Amsterdam, a former world chess champion. Dr. Euwe will play exhibition games at the club Saturday afternoon and Sunday afternoon. His opponent will be 13-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, who gave such a good account of himself in the recent Rosenwald Trophy tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, March 10, 1957 - Page 218

Dr. Max Euwe of Amsterdam, chess champion of the world in 1935, yesterday defeated Bobby Fischer, 13-year-old Brooklyn player, after twenty moves in the first of two-timed exhibition games at the Manhattan Chess Club.
The distinguished visitor played the Queen's Pawn opening. His youthful opponent set up a Nimzo-India defense. Never losing the initiative, Euwe set up a battery with queen and bishop against the black king, forcing it to move. A brilliant combination, slashing the center, brought about a situation in which Fischer was faced with the alternative of losing his queen or being checkmated.
The second game is scheduled for 2:30 o'clock this afternoon at the Manhattan C.C., when Fischer will play the white pieces.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, March 11, 1957 - Page 29

Dr. Euwe Plays Draw
The second game of the exhibition series between Dr. Max Euwe of Amsterdam and Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn resulted in a draw after 41 moves at the Manhattan Chess Club.
The 13-year-old student played white and adopted a Ruy Lopez. He succeeded in capturing a pawn at an early stage, but in the position that ensued they were left with bishops commanding squares of opposite colors.
The former world champion experienced no difficulty in holding to a forced draw. Dr. Euwe was the winner of the first game on Saturday, thanks to a brilliant sacrificial combination.
Three games were finished in the club's championship finals. George Kramer won his adjourned game from Walter J. Shipman and then drew with Max Pavey, the club champion.
Arthur Feuerstein gained a second-round victory over Hugh Myers. Arthur B. Bisguier drew his first game with Abe Turner and Shipman won from Hugh Myers.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, May 04, 1957 - Page 11

Dr. Max Euwe Vs. Bobby Fischer at Manhattan Chess Club
Dr. Max Euwe, former world champion from Holland, over on a business trip, played several exhibition games with prodigy Bobby Fischer in the Manhattan C.C. He won the first quickly but had to concede a draw, a pawn down, in the second game.

Dr. Max Euwe Vs. Bobby Fischer at Manhattan Chess Club

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, May 27, 1957, Page 51

Manhattan Club Ahead
“William Lombardy, Walter J. Shipman and Bobby Fischer also gained triumphs for the Manhattan Club. Saul Wachs was the only other Marshall Club winner.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

Daily News New York, New York Tuesday, June 11, 1957 - Page 79

Chess Star, 14, Invited
Chess expert Bobby Fischer, 14, of 560 Lincoln Place, has been tapped for international competition. The Erasmus High freshmen, according to the British Chess Journal, has been invited to be one of 10 players from various countries to play in the year's top international event, the Hastings Christmas Tournament in Hastings, England, Dec. 30 through Jan. 8.

Chess Star, 14, Invited

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, June 11, 1957 - Page 45

Brooklyn Boy Is Invited To Play Chess Masters
Bobby Fischer, a Brooklyn youngster who is stumping many adults with his ability to maneuver chessmen, may take part in one of the year's top international tournaments.
The 14-year-old freshman at Erasmus Hall High School has been invited to the Hastings, England, Christmas tournament.
The event is limited to ten of the world's leading players. Fischer, the only American invited as of yesterday, was invited to play last year but did not accept.
The last American to win at Hastings was Samuel Reshevsky in 1937.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, June 14, 1957 - Page 28

Reshevsky Beats 6 of 10 Foes
“The time limit was ten seconds a move. Victorious over Reshevsky were Irving Heitner, Carl Burger, Bobby Fischer and Arthur Feuerstein.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, June 16, 1957 - Page 63

Manhattan Club Wins
Once more the championship of the Metropolitan Chess League of New York depended on the final match between the Manhattan and Marshall Chess Clubs. The Manhattan team, which has won with almost monotonous regularity, was against successful, by a close 7-6 margin.
Following is the line-up, and a good victory by the youngest contestant, 13-year-old Bobby Fischer.

Manhattan Club Wins

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, June 23, 1957 - Page 72

Experience Beats Youth
Dr. Max Euwe of Holland, former world champion was in New York recently on a short business trip. Taking advantage of his presence, he was matched in two exhibition games against Bobby Fischer, star of the up and coming generation.
One game was drawn. In the other, given below, Euwe's more than four decades advantage in experience soon told. Fischer did not develop effectively, and was soon crushed by a beautifully timed onslaught.

Experience Beats Youth

The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, June 23, 1957 - Page 37

Child Prodigies In Chess
“The latest, and very possibly the most talented addition to the ranks, is 13-year-old Bobby Fischer.
After winning the USA Junior Championship when still 12, and showing exceptional ability in a number of other events, including the 1956 U.S. Open (a 101 player, 12-round Swiss), where he scored eight and one-half points and was undefeated.”

Child Prodigies In Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 23, 1957 - Page 173

Another Child Prodigy Stirs Chess World
Bobby Fischer, at 14, Hailed as ‘Genius’ in Leap to Fame
Brooklyn Schoolboy Addicted to Game Since He Was 6
By Gay Talese
At an air-conditioned bar the other day rear the Manhattan Chess Club, Robert James Fischer, wearing sneakers, khaki pants and a T-shirt, sipped a Coke and announced that he had become a chess addict at the age of 6.
He admitted that in his younger days he cried whenever he lost at chess and sometimes he remained despondent for days. But he does not cry any more, possibly because he does not often lose these days, or maybe he is just getting old.
He is now 14.
In the past year the child prodigy from Brooklyn has beaten some of the nation's finest players and has generated more international hullabaloo than any other American player. At the Manhattan Chess Club, an orderly salon in the West Sixties where people normally are as close-mouthed as Pinkerton agents, he has become a subject of constant discussion.
Chess masters and critics have called him, variously, a “genius;” “the finest player for his age in the world today;” “potentially a world champion.” Maurice J. Kasper, president of the Manhattan Chess Club, says, “Players with Fischer's talent come along only once in a century.”
Older Players Disconcerted
Others say that Fischer is a highly emotional, tense combatant whose cockiness often disconcerts the older masters, particularly when he defeats them. Always serious, he peers grimly down at the chessboard as if the fate of mankind hinged on his next move.
But in any case, Fischer is a much sought-after chess master in America, in England, even in Russia.
The chess section of the Soviet Union this week expressed its willingness to entertain Fischer this summer. Last week he was invited to visit England to compete in the Hastings Christmas tournament, which traditionally is limited to ten players from all over the world. Only July 8, he will be in San Francisco defending the national junior chess title he won last year in Philadelphia.
Chess was frowned upon in Fischer's home. Neither of his parents, now divorced, understood the game.
“I spent four years trying to get him away from it,” his mother recalls. “I thought it would be too much strain on him.” She could do nothing with him. Nowadays he plays chess during breakfast, and has a chessboard permanently stationed at his bedside.
Sister His First Teacher
“My sister, who is not very good, first taught me the chess moves,” Bobby says. “I bought all the Russian chess manuals and books, and studied to win. I have now about forty chess books at home. I did not like losing when I began playing. Yes, sometimes I did cry when I lost, but I don't cry any more.
“I'm thrilled about winning, but I try to be nice to people. I don't know if older persons are embarrassed about losing to me, but I do not feel awkward about playing them—or beating them. I beat them, or they'll beat me.”
It has been said by William Lombardy, a high-ranking New York player, “You have to beat Bobby to gain his respect.”
Fischer's rise into the upper echelons of chess was meteoric.
Last October, at the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy tournament here, the Erasmus High School freshmen played brilliantly and defeated Donald Byrne, a former national champion. After the match, Al Horowitz, editor of The Chess Review, said, “Nobody in the world could have played better than Fischer on this occasion.”
Genius being as unpredictable as it is astounding, the future of the remarkable Bobby is anyone's guess.
Hans Kmoch, secretary of the Manhattan Chess Club, believes that Bobby is, at 14, the equal of other child wizards of days past—Paul Morphy, José R. Capablanca and Samuel Reshevsky.
Among Club's First Ten
According to Kmoch, Fischer right now is among the first ten players at the Manhattan Chess Club, which has more than 300 members and the finest talent in the country. “In a few years, if Fischer continues to develop,” said Kmoch, “he could be among the top five or ten players in the world.”
Why is Fischer great?
“That phenomenal mind of his,” said Kmoch. “He has the mind that ‘sees’ the combinations on the board. With just one glance, he can see the possible moves of the thirty-two men on the board with the sixty-four squares.
“There is no specific talent for chess. You cannot learn to be great. But some geniuses have the innate feeling for the combinations.’ Fischer is such a genius.”
The young genius had no explanation for his genius. He simply ordered another Coke.

Another Child Prodigy Stirs Chess World

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, June 27, 1957 - Page 16

The U.S. Junior Championship, open to players under 20, will begin July 8 at San Francisco. Bobby Fischer may compete in this event, but it is also possible that the 14-year-old Brooklyn star will travel to Iceland as a member of the American team that will compete there for the college world championship next month.”

The U.S. Junior Championship

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, July 05, 1957 - Page 21

Fischer Gains In Chess
Brooklyn Boy Beats Fauber at Milwaukee—Evans Wins
Milwaukee, July 4—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, Larry Evans of New York and Donald Byrne of Ann Arbor, Mich., scored decisive victories in the first round of the Western chess tournament today.
Evans, former United States champion, defeated Roman Zolla of Chicago in a Sicilian defense lasting thirty moves. The New Yorker gained full control of the center, after which his success was assured.
Fischer, 14 years old, downed Richard Fauber of Madison, Wis., in thirty-two moves after capturing two pawns in a reversed King's Indian defense. Byrne beat Samuel Baron of Brooklyn in a King's Indian defense lasting thirty-one moves.
Other victors in the eight-round Swiss competition were: Hans Berliner of Washington, who defeated O.W. Manney of Detroit in thirty-four moves, and Norman T. Whitaker of Shadyside, Md., who halted Dr. Gaba of Detroit.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, July 6, 1957 - Page 13

Fischer Defeats Elo In 49 Moves; Evans and Byrne Also Notch Second-Round Victories in Western Title Chess
Milwaukee, July 5—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the United States open junior champion, and Larry Evans of New York, former champion of the United States, won again in the second round of the Western chess championship at the Hotel Astor today.
Fischer was paired with Arpad Elo, highest ranking chess master in Milwaukee. Elo offered stout opposition, but lost a piece in the ending of a Sicilian defense. The 14-year-old Fischer scored in forty-nine moves.

Other second-round winners who were tied at 2—0 with Fischer, Evans and Byrne…

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 11, 1957 - Page 19

All American chess players are aware of the rapid rise of Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old Brooklyn lad, to prominence in the game. It may surprise many of them, however to learn that Bobby recently defeated Samuel Reshevsky, long recognized as our our No. 1 player. The score of the game is appended below.
Of course Bobby isn't quite as good as the preceding paragraph might imply. His victory over Reshevsky came in a blindfold simultaneous exhibition by the American ace at the Manhattan Chess Club, played at the speed of 10 seconds a move. Three of the other experts as well as young Fischer defeated Reshevsky, while he won at six boards.

Rapid Rise of Bobby Fischer - Defeat of Samuel Reshevsky

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, July 14, 1957 - Page 148

Bobby Fischer is Ahead
San Francisco, July 13—After seven rounds of the tournament for the national junior chess championship. Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the defending champion, is leading with a score of 6½-½. Bobby is followed by Gilbert Ramirez of this city with 6—1. Eight states are represented among the thirty-three entries and George Koltanowski of San Francisco, former champion of Belgium, is directing the play.
The leaders met in the fifth round, wherein they drew a King's Indian defense in twenty-five moves. Fischer won from Stephen Sholomson of Los Angeles in the sixth round after thirty-two moves of a Pirc defense.
Fischer adopted the King's Indian defense in round 7 against Mike Bredoff of Redwood City and won in twenty-nine moves.
Other leaders, Sholomson, Leonard Hill, San Francisco; and Robert Walker, Portland, Ore., have scores of 5—2.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, July 14, 1957 - Page 36

“After three rounds Stephen Sholomson, only Los Angeles entrant, was tied at 3-0 with Defending Champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y., and William Haines of Sacramento. Gilbert, Ramirez of San Francisco, California Junior champion, scored 2½-½. He drew in the first round with Richard Owen of Salt Lake City, Utah.”

Bobby Fischer and Stephen Sholomson in a Tie

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, July 15, 1957 - Page 26

Fischer Retains Title
San Francisco, July 14—Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old Brooklyn player, retained the championship today in the United States junior chess tournament with a total of 8½ points. He won eight matches and drew one in the the nine rounds.
The runner-up was Gilbert Ramirez of San Francisco, junior champion of California, with 7½ points. Ramirez drew his fifth-round game with Fischer

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

Daily News New York, New York Thursday, July 18, 1957 - Page 495

Chess Junket Funds Sought
The United States Chess Federation is seeking the necessary funds to permit the U.S. junior chess champion, Bobby Fischer, 14, or 650 Lincoln Place, to accept an invitation to play in Russia. Because of his age, the federation feels Bobby should be accompanied by several older players during the August trip. It hopes for contributions from chess fans and clubs and the general public to finance it.

Chess Junket Funds Sought

The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, July 20, 1957 - Page 31

Invitation to Hastings Christmas Tournament
“Young Bobby Fischer, New York, will be invited to the Hastings Xmas Premier. Russia is also interested in a visit from the prodigy.”

Invitation to Hastings Christmas Tournament

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 25, 1957 - Page 19

Bobby Fischer at San Francisco
Bobby Fischer, of Brooklyn, after finishing sixth behind Donald Byrne, the winner, and Larry Evans in the Western Open at Milwaukee, has successfully defended his national junior championship at San Francisco.
The 14-year-old Brooklyn lad finished with a score of 8½-½ in the field of 33. His only draw came against Gilbert Ramirez of San Francisco, in the fifth round. Ramirez had two other draws but finished runner-up to Fischer with a mark of 7½-1½.”

Bobby Fischer at San Francisco

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, July 28, 1957 - Page 81

Invitation to Fischer
United States Junior Chess Champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn has been invited to play chess in Russia the latter part of August. Because of his youth, 14 years, the U.S. Chess Federation feels it advisable that he be accompanied by several older chess players. They are now asking contributions from chess players and chess clubs to provide air transportation for the group. The trip is planned to start at the close of the Open Championship Tournament at Cleveland.

Invitation to Fischer

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, July 28, 1957 - Page 49

Bobby Fischer took sixth place with 6-2
“Bobby Fischer took sixth place with 6-2. Following are games from the tournament…
Elo Vs. Fischer…

Bobby Fischer took sixth place with 6-2

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 08, 1957 - Page 35

Seven New Yorkers Victors in Second Round of Open Tourney in Cleveland
“Seven of the New Yorkers in the annual open championship of the United States Chess Federation at the Hotel Manger today won their second-round matches and registered scores of 2—0 each.
Those who triumphed included Arthur B. Bisguier, Anthony E. Santasiere, Bobby Fischer, Edmar Mednis, Karl Burger, Allen Kaufman and Jeremiah F. Donovan.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Friday, August 09, 1957 - Page 37

Chess Group Asks Soviet Visa Speed
CLEVELAND, August 8 (AP)—The U.S. Chess Federation cabled Soviet Leader Nikita S. Khrushchev today with a request that he help speed up visas for two contestants in the federation's tournament here for their trip to Moscow to compete with Russian players.
The players are Bobby Fischer, 14, of Brooklyn, N.Y. who has been the U.S. junior chess champion twice, and Edmar Mednis, 20, of New York City, the intercollegiate champion.
Their passports are at the Soviet Embassy in Washington awaiting Soviet approval for visas.

Chess Group Asks Soviet Visa Speed

This article also appears in,

Jim Thorpe Times News, Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, Friday, August 09, 1957 - Page 4

Bobby Fischer Waits on Visa to Compete With Russian Players
BOBBY FISCHER, 14, of New York, junior chess champion, studies his next move as he awaits a visa so that he can compete with Russian players. The U.S. Chess Federation has cabled Communist leader Nikita Khrushchev a reminder of his TV statement urging cultural exchange, along with a request he speed up visas for Bobby and Edmar Mednis, who is intercollegiate champion.

Bobby Fischer Waits on Visa to Compete With Russian Players

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 10, 1957 - Page 25

“Arthur Bisguier, the United States champion; Paul Brandts, Karl Burger, Bobby Fischer and Edmar Mednis, also New Yorkers, are tied at 3½—½, along with Robert Byrne of Indianapolis and Gilbert J. Ramirez of San Francisco.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 11, 1957 - Page 152

Two Players Pace Cleveland Chess
“The United States champion, Arthur B. Bisguier of New York, was held to a draw by Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old player from Brooklyn. Both are 4—1, with Karl Burger of New York, Atillio Di Camillo of Philadelphia and Fuster.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, August 12, 1957 - Page 25

Half a point behind, all with 5-1 scores, were Robert Byrne of Indianapolis, Geza Fuster of Toronto and Karl Burger, Bobby Fischer, Edmar Mednis and Allen Kaufman, all of New York.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, August 13, 1957 - Page 44

“Addison, at 6—1, tied for second place with Bobby Fischer and Edmar Mednis, both of New York.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

This article also appears in,

The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Tuesday, August 13, 1957 - Page 14

2 Tied for First In Chess Tourney
CLEVELAND, August 12 (AP)—At the half-way point of the U.S. Chess Federation's open tournament, Donald Byrnes of New York and Hans Berliner of Washington, D.C. are tied for the lead with 5½ points.
Tied for second place with five points are Robert Byrne, Edmar Mednis, Allen Kaufman and 14-year-old Bobby Fischer, all of New York, and Geza Furstner of Toronto, William Addision of San Francisco and Igor Garais of Cleveland.
In the women's open championship, Graf Stephenson of Los Angeles and Eva Aronson of Chicago are tied for the lead with three points each.
Addison scored a major upset in the tournament last night by defeating Arthur B. Bisguier of New York, the present national chess champion.

2 Tied for First In Chess Tourney

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, August 14, 1957 - Page 31

U.S. Open Tourney
“Fourteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn had a tally of 7—1. Fischer beat Edmar Mednis of New York University. This placed the Brooklyn lad in the runner-up position and he was automatically paired with the leader for the ninth round.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Thursday, August 15, 1957 - Page 21

Boy 14, Leads Chess Tourney
CLEVELAND, O., August 15 (UP)—Bobby Fischer, 14 years old, of Brooklyn, N.Y., emerged today as the man to beat in the fifty-eighth annual United States open chess tournament. Fischer played to a draw in the tenth round last night with Robert Byrne of New York City, thus advancing as leader among the 176 contestants with 8½ points.

Boy 14, Leads Chess Tourney

The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, August 15, 1957 - Page 26

Shows ’Em How
CLEVELAND, Aug. 14 (AP) —Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old chess wizard from Brooklyn, N.Y., took over the lead of the open tournament of the U.S. Chess Federation today by winning his ninth round game from Donald Byrne of New York.
That gave Bobby eight points, a lead of half a point over Byrne and the latter's brother Robert.
There are 176 contestants and the tournament will end Friday after the 12th round.

Bobby Fischer Takes Over Lead of U.S. Open Tournament

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 15, 1957 - Page 20

Boy, 14, Tops Play in Chess Tourney
Cleveland, Aug. 15 (UP)—Bobby Fischer, 14, of Brooklyn, emerged today as the man to beat in the 58th annual U.S. Open Chess Tournament, with prospects that he will become the youngest open champion in the history of U.S. competition.
Fischer played to a draw in the 10th round Wednesday night with Robert Byrne, of New York City, thus advancing as leader among the 176 contestants with 8½ points.
Byrne and Arthur Bisguier, also of New York, are tied for second place with eight points apiece, but Fischer must now dip down into the six contestants tied for third with 7½ points each for his next opponent.
Since Fischer advanced against Byrne, he is prohibited by game rules from replaying a former opponent.
The field of six players, one of whom Fischer will play in the semi-final round tonight, includes Orest Popvych, of Lakewood, N.J.

Boy, 14, Tops Play in Chess Tourney

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 15, 1957 - Page 27

Fischer Captures Lead In U.S. Chess
Cleveland, Aug. 14—After compiling a score of 7½-½ in his first eight games in the annual tournament for the open championship of the United States Chess Federation, Donald Byrne of Ann Arbor, Mich., was beaten in the ninth round today.
The former Yale star was defeated by 14-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn. Fischer, on the black side of a King's Indian defense, won in forty-one moves.
Attaining a total score of 8-1, Bobby took the lead from his rival.
The latter dropped to a tie for second place with his brother, Robert, of Indianapolis. It will be Robert's turn to take on Fischer in the tenth round.
Following is the score of the game Fischer won from Donald Byrne:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, August 16, 1957 - Page 14

Donald Byrne Ties Fischer In U.S. Chess
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn was held to a draw by Robert Byrne of Indianapolis, Donald's older brother. Fischer and Donald are tied for first place at 8½—1½.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Friday, August 16, 1957 - Page 18

CHESS EXPERT PONDERS—Bobby Fischer, 14, chews his tongue as he takes the lead for the U.S. Open Chess Championship in Cleveland. If the Brooklyn boy keeps the lead, he will be youngest champ in history. Bobby is one of four contestants playing the final round of the tournament today. Title money of $1000 is at stake.

Chess Expert Ponders

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Friday, August 16, 1957 - Page 49

Two Share Lead In U.S. Open: Fischer and Donald Byrne Tied for First Place
“Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn was held to a draw by Robert Byrne of Indianapolis, Donald's older brother. Fischer and Donald Byrne are tied for first place at 8½-1½.”

Two Share Lead In U.S. Open: Fischer and Donald Byrne Tied for First Place

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 17, 1957 - Page 12

Fischer Captures Open Chess Title
14-Year-Old Erasmus High Student Wins U.S. Crown —Bisguier Is Second
Cleveland, Aug. 16—Bobby Fischer, 14 years old, a student at Erasmus Hall High in Brooklyn, tonight won the annual tournament for the open championship of the United States Chess Federation at the Manger Hotel.
Fischer finished in a tie with Arthur B. Bisguier of New York, the United States champion.
Each was credited with 10 of a possible 12 points. The tournament director, George Koltanowski of San Francisco, consulted the U.S.C.F. Blue Book for a tie-breaking system and declared Fischer to be the new champion. Bisguier was the defending titleholder.
Fischer's last opponent was Walter J. Shipman of New York who, conducting the black pieces, drew with the little champion.
Bisguier, in his best form, defeated Donald Byrne of Ann Arbor, Mich., and toppled that player from first place. Donald wound up in third place with a score of 9½—2½
Bisguier and Fischer were in receipt of congratulatory telegrams inviting them to a reception in their honor at the Manhattan Chess Club Friday evening.
Shipman finished in a quadruple tie for fourth place. The others with that score were Robert Byrne of Indianapolis and Edmar Mednis and Anthony E. Santasiere, both of New York. Robert Byrne defeated Morton Siegel of New York. Mednis won from Orest Popovych of Lakewood, N.J. and Santasiere scored against Hans Berliner of Washington, D.C.
Anthony F. Saidy of New York, at 8½—3½, was tied by Paul Brandts, New York, and J. Theodorovitsch of Toronto.
Scores of 8—4 were compiled by Berliner, Siegel, Popovych, Atillio Di Camillio of Philadelphia, Gerald Fielding of Regina, Canada, and William G. Addison of San Francisco.
Victor Guala and Jack W. Collins of New York and Dr. Erich W. Marchand of Rochester, N.Y., tied at 7½—4½.

Fischer Captures Open Chess Title

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The News Journal, Wilmington, Delaware, Saturday, August 17, 1957 - Page 8

U.S. Chess Title Won By Brooklyn Boy, 14

CLEVELAND, August 17 (AP)— When tournament directors last night declared defending champion Arthur B. Bisguier, 26, of New York the winner of the U.S. Chess Federation's Open Tournament, 14-year-old Bobby Fischer protested that there had been a mistake in the scoring.
Tournament officials spent an hour checking the complicated chess scoring system and then discovered they had awarded Bisguier too many points. They reversed their decision and declared Fischer the new open champion. He is the youngest player ever to win the tournament.
Fischer and Bisguier, who was dropped into second place, split the top prize of $1,500 under tournament rules.
Some 176 chess players from the United States, Canada and Mexico took part in the 12-day tournament.

U.S. Chess Title Won By Brooklyn Boy, 14

The Daily Times, New Philadelphia, Ohio, Saturday, August 17, 1957 - Page 26

New Chess Champ Only 14 Years Old
CLEVELAND (INS) — Bobby Fischer, 14, of Brooklyn, N.Y. captured the U.S. open chess tournament championship in Cleveland Friday night to become the youngest person ever to win the crown.

New Chess Champ Only 14 Years Old

The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, August 17, 1957 - Page 33

“Bobby Fischer, 14 yr. old N.Y. master, retained the USA Junior title at San Francisco, 8½-½ pts. Gil Ramirez, San Francisco, held Bobby to a draw and placed second with 7½-1½. Thirty-three from eight states competed. Spreckles-Russell Dairies provided the auditorium as well as unlimited quantities of milk and ice cream!
Don Byrne and Larry Evans N.Y., tied 7-1 each in the Western Championship at Milwaukee, but Byrne placed first on the tie-breaking S-B pts. In the huge field of 125 players, young Bobby Fischer finished in the 6th place tie with 6-2 pts.

Bobby Fischer Retained U.S. Junior Title

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, August 18, 1957 - Page 73

Byrne And Fischer Tied In Semifinal
With one round remaining to be played in the Open Championship of the U.S. Chess Federation at the Manger Hotel in Cleveland, Donald Byrne of Ann Arbor, Mich., is tied for first place with Junior Champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, according to a report from the New York Times.
Each player won his 11th-round game and has a 9½-1½ score. Donald Byrne defeated his older brother Robert of Indianapolis. They have been rivals since they played chess together at Yale. Fischer, a 14-year-old student of Erasmus Hall High School, outmaneuvered William G. Addison of San Francisco.
Donald Byrne had led the tournament for eight rounds but met his first setback in the ninth round at the hands of Fischer, who then took the lead by half a point. In the following game Fischer drew with Robert Byrne to drop back level with Donald.…

Byrne And Fischer Tied In Semifinal

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 18, 1957 - Page 34

Bobby Fischer and National Open
“After the first week of play in the National Open at the Hotel Manger in Cleveland, Allen Kaufman of the Marshall Chess Club in new York has undisputed possession of first place. He has won all games played. Several are now tied for second place… Bobby Fischer …

Bobby Fischer and National Open

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The Daily Herald, Provo, Utah, Sunday, August 18, 1957 - Page 16

14-Year-Old Cops U.S. Chess Title
CLEVELAND, Ohio (UP) — Robert Fischer, 14, of Brooklyn N.Y. won the championship title of the 58th annual National Open Chess Tournament Friday night, besting any number of older players before tying tournament veteran Arthur Bisguier of New York City.
At first, young Bobby was declared the loser, and called his mother in Brooklyn to make the sad admission that he had not gained the international chess crown.
He and Bisguier, an IBM problemist, had tied at 10 points.
Then, two mathematicians refigured the highly complicated system of computing honors. After consulting the Encyclopedia of chess, the experts named the teenage lad champion.
That called for a second phone call to mother.

TITLE OF ARTICLE

Medford Mail Tribune, Medford, Oregon, Sunday, August 18, 1957 - Page 12

Chess Champion
Cleveland, Ohio—(UP)—Robert Fischer, 14, of Brooklyn, N.Y., won the championship of the 58th annual National Open besting any number of older players before tying tournament veteran Arthur Bisguier of New York City.

Chess Champion

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 22, 1957 - Page 25

Bobby Fischer Becomes New Champion of the United States

Two players still in their teens have just captured two major tournaments… The other youthful star to gain new laurels for himself this month is Robert Fischer, sensational 14-year-old from Brooklyn.
Bobby became the new open champion of the United States in a hard-fought tournament at Cleveland. He came from behind to defeat Donald Byrne in a ninth-round game when the latter had a half-point lead on him.
Then Bobby survived a tie in the final standings with Arthur Bisguier and succeeded the latter as champion under the tie-breaking procedure, after it was first erroneously announced that Bisguier had been adjudged the victor. Both players had finished at 10 points.

Bobby Fischer Becomes New Champion of the United States

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, August 23, 1957 - Page 15

“Byrne is one of the three guests to be feted tonight at a reception at the Manhattan Chess Club. The others are William Lombardy, who won the world junior championship at Toronto a week ago, and Bobby Fischer, 14, the United States junior champion.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, August 25, 1957 - Page 66

Fischer Takes Open Event At Cleveland
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old student at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, won the Open Championship of the U.S. Chess Federation in the tournament concluded last week at Cleveland, according to a report from the New York Times.
Fischer, who had been tied with Donald Byrne of Ann Arbor, Mich., before starting the final round, was held to a draw by Walter J. Shipman of New York. That left him with a 10-2 score, with the final result still in doubt.
[…]
The tie-breaking system now had to be computed by George Koltanowski of San Francisco, who directed the tournament. The first report had Bisguier on top, but further involved arithmetic moved Fischer into the winning position. The reaction of the large audience clearly indicated that this was the popular result.

Fischer Takes Open Event At Cleveland

Hartford Courant Hartford, Connecticut Sunday, August 25, 1957 - Page 40

U.S. Junior Champion and U.S. Open Champion
The tournament for junior chess players, held at San Francisco, was attended by 33 players, mostly from the coast, and was won by Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn with a score of 8½-½.

U.S. Open Champion
The tournament held at the Manger Hotel in Cleveland has been concluded. The last information we have from a New York newspaper is that with one round to be concluded, Donald Byrne of Ann Arbor was tied with Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn for first place, Arthur Bisguier, former champion, trailed by ½ game, and may now be in first place.

U.S. Junior Champion and U.S. Open Champion

The Evening Times, Sayre, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, August 27, 1957 - Page 6, (2), (3), (4)

“Impossible? Consider the case of Bobby Fischer, 14 Bobby started playing chess at the age of six, when most children are having a hard time learning to read. On Aug. 17 he was declared the winner of the U.S. open tournament in Cleveland, the youngest player ever to gain this honor. This tourney was the strongest ever held, ie, had the largest amount of masters competing.”
[…]
“The biggest dispute in the tournament was when directors made a mistake in scoring and awarded the title to Arthur Bisguier, 26, defending champion. A recount revealed that the 14 year old Fischer was the winner. The championship is not decided by an elimination system.”

Sayre Youth, Chess, Bobby Fischer

Daily News New York, New York Saturday, August 31, 1957 - Page 59

Chess Is His Game
“Erasmus’ Bobby Fischer gave up basketball playing to devote all his energy to chess. The 14-year-old sophomore, who now ranks with the best five in the U.S. hopes to meet Russia's top chessmen during the winter.”

Chess Is His Game

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 1, 1957 - Page 111

Mengarini and Fischer Win
East Orange, N.J., Aug. 31—Dr. Ariel Mengarini of New York, former national amateur champion, and Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, United States open champion, today notched their second straight victories in the open tournament of the New Jersey State Chess Federation at the Independent Chess Club. Eighty-one are competing for seven rounds.
Others with scores of 2-0 were Anthony F. Saidy of Fordham University, Leonard Birns of New York, Charles Henin of Chicago and Fort Dix, Philip Selvaggi of Palmyra and Peter Berlow of South Orange.

Mengarini and Fischer Win

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 2, 1957 - Page 17

“Tied for second at 3½—½ were Arthur Feuerstein and Bobby Fischer, both of New York, and Robert Sobel of Philadelphia. At 3—1 were James T. Sherwin, Paul Brandts, Joseph Richman and Mitchel Saltzberg of New York…”

Bobby Fischer and Arthur Feuerstein Tied for Second

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 03, 1957 - Page 33

Fischer, 14, Takes Jersey Open Chess
East Orange, N.J., Sept. 2—With the defeat of James T. Sherwin of New York, whereby he attained a score of 6½—½, Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old expert from Brooklyn, the United States open champion, emerged tonight as winner of the open championship of the New Jersey State Chess Federation.
Anthony F. Saidy of Douglaston, L.I., was the runner-up with a score of 6—1 after winning from Matthew Green of Sussex, N.J. Arthur Feuerstein of New York and Robert Sobel of Philadelphia, with scores of 5½—1½, shared the third and fourth prizes.
Green, Sherwin, Mitchel Saltzberg and Leonard Birns of New York and LeRoy Dubeck of South Orange tied at 5—2.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 05, 1957 - Page 5

Brooklyn Boy of 14 Rising to Prominence
“Brooklyn's 14-year-old Bobby Fischer is rising rapidly to pre-eminence in American chess.
Fresh from his victory in the U.S. Open Championship at Cleveland, Bobby over the Labor Day weekend added the New Jersey Open title to his list. With a score of 6½-½, he finished a clear half-point ahead of the runner-up, Arthur F. Saidy, of Douglaston, L.I.”

Brooklyn Boy of 14 Rising to Prominence

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 07, 1957 - Page 27

Fischer A Pawn Ahead
Cardoso Seals 47th Move in First Game of Series
Bobby Fischer, 14, of Brooklyn, United States junior and open champion, came close to meeting his match last night in the first of a series of eight games with Rodolfo T. Cardoso of Manila, the junior chess champion of the Philippines, at the Manhattan Chess Club.
After forty-six moves of a Sicilian defense adopted by Fischer, Cardoso sealed his forty-seventh move a pawn behind in a position favorable to Fischer.
The score of the adjourned game:

Fischer A Pawn Ahead

The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, September 07, 1957 - Page 22

14 Year Old Wins U.S.A. Open
Bobby Fischer, boy wonder from New York, scored a sensational victory in the U.S.A. Open at Cleveland in which 176 competed, including a number of national masters. Arthur Bisguier national closed champion, tied in earned points, 10-2 each, but Bobby was awarded the title on the S-B tie-breaking system. Fischer defeated Don Byrne, who finished third, and Edmar Mednis among others.

“The following game, played in last year's Canadian Open Championship, ended in a draw but was one of the most exciting of the tourney. …
Sicilian Defense, R. Fischer vs. H. Matthai

14 Year Old Wins U.S.A. Open

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, September 08, 1957 - Page 54

Fischer and Lombardy Capture Titles
“Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old New York whiz kid, has flabbergasted the chess world by winning the U.S. Open title at Cleveland. In the process Bobby beat out U.S. champion Arthur Bisguier and International Master Donald Byrne. Surely this is the fanciest chess wunderkind achievement on record. In our book it ranks higher than Capablanca's capture of the Cuban national title at the age of 12. Young Fischer has been invited to play at Hastings.
William Lombardy, New York, is the first American to win the World Junior title and he did it with a clean score, 11 to 0. Things are looking up, indeed.”

Fischer and Lombardy Capture Titles

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, September 08, 1957 - Page 30

“The guests of honor were Bobby Fischer and Arthur B. Bisguier, victors at Cleveland; Donald Byrne, new western champion, and Samuel Reshevsky, recently conqueror of Bisguier in match play.”

Bobby Fischer, Victor at Cleveland

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 08, 1957 - Page 51

United States Open Champion
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old Erasmus High School student of Brooklyn, won the U.S. Open Championship at Cleveland, with a score of 10-2. Former champion Arthur Bisguier also scored tem gave Fischer first place. Donald Byrne took third place.

United States Open Champion

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 08, 1957 - Page 233

Fischer Defeats Cardoso In Chess
Brooklyn Youth Triumphs in Second Game of Series Here After 31 Moves
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 14-year-old national open chess champion, yesterday won the second contest in his eight-game match with Rodolfo Cardoso of Manila, 19, junior champion of the Philippines, at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Cardoso adopted the Sicilian defense, but lost time in the opening with defensive play on the queen's side of the board.
Fischer built a strong attack against the black king by advancing his pawns, and, by sacrificing one of his bishops, initiated a brilliant winning combination. He scored after thirty-one moves.
The first game had been adjourned with Fischer a pawn ahead.

Fischer Defeats Cardoso In Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 09, 1957 - Page 34

Cardoso Sets Back Fischer In 40 Moves
Rodolfo T. Cardoso of Manila, the junior chess champion of the Philippine, enjoyed the rare distinction yesterday of defeating Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old national open champion from Brooklyn.
It happened in forty moves in the third game of their eight-game match at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Each has now won once. Fischer is a pawn ahead in the adjourned first game.
For the third time, the Sicilian defense was employed. Fischer, with the black pieces, followed conventional lines and castled at his eighth move. Cardoso followed suit on the ninth.
At his thirteenth, Cardoso declined to exchange his queen for two rooks. On the twentieth move Fischer won a pawn and appeared to have the game well in hand. However, on the thirtieth move, he erred in capturing a second pawn.
This loss of time gave Cardoso a chance for a counter-attack on the king's side of the board. Fischer, trying to avoid a perpetual check, lost more time with his thirty-fourth move, whereupon the position reached a climax and, with P-K6 on his thirty-sixth turn. Cardoso brought about a mating position.

Cardoso Sets Back Fischer In 40 Moves

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 12, 1957 - Page 52

Bobby Fischer Vs. R.T. Cardoso, Manhattan Chess Club
“New York's Manhattan Chess Club, scene of the matches between Reshevsky and Byrne and Bisguier, now is staging another match between sensational young Bobby Fischer, newly crowned open, junior, and New Jersey champion, and R.T. Cardoso, Philippines junior champion.
Because Bobby has returned to school, the match is being held on weekends. Games will be played this Saturday and Sunday and the match will conclude on Sept. 21 and 22.”

Bobby Fischer Vs. R.T. Cardoso, Manhattan Chess Club

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 15, 1957 - Page 252

Fischer Gains 2-1 Lead
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old United States open champion, resumed play yesterday in his eight-game match with Rodolfo Cardoso of Manila. The Brooklyn lad defeated Cardoso in the fourth game after forty-six moves at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Fischer increased his advantage to 3-1 last night by winning the adjourned first-round game in fifty-two moves.
With Fischer playing the white side in the afternoon encounter, the Sicilian defense was adopted for the fourth time. Fischer, aiming to establish a passed pawn on the queen's side of the board, succeeded. Holding back the retarded black queen's pawn, he brought his king to a commanding post in the center.
Cardoso parted with two pawns in vain. After all major forces had been exchanged, Fischer wound up with a neat sacrifice of a bishop, thereby paving the way for one of his passed pawns to reach the eighth rank.

Fischer Gains 2-1 Lead

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, September 15, 1957 - Page 42

“U.S. Junior Champion Bobby Fischer, 14, became the youngest player to ever win the U.S. Open.”

Bobby Fischer, U.S. Junior Champion Becomes Youngest Player to Win U.S. Open

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 16, 1957 - Page 36

Fischer Chess Victor; Beats Cardoso in 36 Moves to Raise Lead to 4-1
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn yesterday defeated Rodolfo Cardoso of Manila in thirty-six moves in the fifth game of their match at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Fischer, the 14-year-old national open champion, now leads, 4—1. He won the adjourned first game Saturday night.

Fischer Chess Victor; Beats Cardoso in 36 Moves to Raise Lead to 4-1

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 19, 1957 - Page 5

Bobby Fischer at U.S. Open: Game that Gave Bobby Fischer His Victory
“Following is the game that can be said to have given 14-year-old Bobby Fischer his victory in the U.S. Open. It was played against W.G. Addison of San Francisco. Addison was the only player to defeat Bisguier during the tournament. Since Bobby and the defending titlist finished in a 10-2 tie, and since Bobby defeated Addison in the game shown here, the tie-breaking rules naturally gave him the edge over Bisguier—and with it the championship.”

Bobby Fischer at U.S. Open: Game that Gave Bobby Fischer His Victory

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, September 19, 1957 - Page 17

Hastings Congress
“It is now doubtful if Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old American prodigy, will compete in the Hastings congress. The United States championship is scheduled for December, and Fischer is unlikely to compete in both events. Gligoric (Yugoslavia) will probably be invited to replace him.”

Hastings Congress

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, September 22, 1957 - Page 71

Fischer Wins In Jersey
Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old Brooklyn expert who recently captured the U.S. Open and Junior Championships, added the Open Championship of New Jersey to his growing list of titles.
Fischer wound up his schedule in the tournament played in East Orange, N.J., with the winning score of 6½-½. Anthony F. Saidy of Douglaston, L.I., was runner-up with 6-1. Third and fourth prizes were shared by Arthur Feuerstein of New York and Robert Sobel of Philadelphia, who tallied 5½-1½.

Fischer Cardoso Match
In another of a series of interesting matches staged by the Manhattan Chess Club in New York, Bobby Fischer is taking on Rodolfo Cardoso of Manila, junior champion of the Philippine Islands.
After completing three of the scheduled eight games, the score is one win apiece and an adjourned game in which Fischer has a favourable position.
In the third game, the most exciting of the series to date, Fischer played the Sicilian Defense. After an advance on the Queen side he won a Pawn and seemed to have all the better of the game.
Fischer continued to play for material advantage and on his 30th turn took another Pawn. Cardoso had been quietly preparing for an onslaught against the King and Fischer's loss of time gave him the opportunity for a decisive mating attack.

Fischer Wins In Jersey : Fischer Cardoso Match

Daily News New York, New York Sunday, September 22, 1957 - Page 767

Youth On The Ball
Manhattan: Listen, you wise guys who run around in gangs raising hell: can you top what two New York students did? Nineteen-year-old William Lombardy of CCNY became world junior chess champ, winning by a bull's-eye score of 11-0. Fourteen-year-old Robert (Bobby) Fischer won the U.S. junior championship twice in a row; also, this year, became the U.S. open champ, beating out men and women old enough to be his parents and then some. Can you top them?
Paul Leith

Youth On The Ball

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 23, 1957 - Page 34

Chess Test Adjourned: Fischer, Cardoso Are Even After Forty Moves
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 14-year-old national open chess champion, and Rodolfo Cardoso of Manila, junior champion of the Philippines, met yesterday in the seventh game of their eight-game match at the Manhattan Chess Club and played until adjournment times without reaching a decision.
After forty moves Cardoso sealed his forty-first move in a virtually even position. Play will be resumed at the weekend. The final game was scheduled for Thursday evening.
Fischer, 4½-1½, has clinched the match.
The seventh-game score:

Chess Test Adjourned: Fischer, Cardoso Are Even After Forty Moves

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 26, 1957 - Page 5

Bobby Fischer Compared to Morphy, Capablanca and Reshevsky
Critics following the sensational career of Bobby Fischer are beginning to compare him with such other youthful wonders as Morphy, Capablanca and Reshevsky. Such high praise may be a bit extravagant, but plausible evidence can be produced to show that Bobby's accomplishments at his present age, 14, are at least as great as these other stars had at the same stage of their development.
Bobby has been playing a match at the Manhattan Chess Club with Rodolfo Cardoso, 19, of Manila, junior champion of the Philippine Islands. Bobby has won four of their first five games, losing the third.
Here is the score of the second game of the match:”

Bobby Fischer Compared to Morphy, Capablanca and Reshevsky

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, September 29, 1957 - Page 43

“…Bobby Fischer, U.S. Open champion, will complete the list of 14 who will play a round-robin tournament for the title.

Fischer Clinches Match

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 14-year-old U.S. Open and Junior champion, clinched his match with Rodolpho Cardoso, junior champion of the Philippine Islands, when he drew the sixth game to run his score up to 4½-1½.
The match, being played at the Manhattan Chess Club in New York, has two more games to go, but Fischer can no longer be overtaken. Following are games from the match.”

Fischer Clinches Match

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 29, 1957 - Page 66

“Quite a little is being made of Bobby Fischer, who first won the title of U.S. Junior Champion, and then took the greater title of U.S. Open Champion. He also stood high in the Rosenwald Trophy Tournament. The following was played in the later tournament. Note that Bobby used ten checks before mate.”

Quite A Little Bit Is Being Made of Bobby Fischer

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, October 03, 1957 - Page 46

Bobby Fischer Soars from Class B Figure (1726 to 2298) Skipping Class A into Master Division
The sensational young Bobby Fischer soared from a mere Class B figure of 1726 to 2298, skipping Class A altogether as he vaulted into the master division. At the age of 14, he doubtless will make the “senior” master category in the next supplementary list, when he is credited with his victory in the U.S. Open championship.
Speaking of Bobby Fischer, since his brilliant success at Cleveland and his later one in the New Jersey Open, his star continues undimmed. He has just scored a decisive triumph over 19-year-old Rodolfo Cardoso, junior champion of the Philippine Islands, in an eight game match at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Last week we published the score of their second game in which Bobby conducted the white side of a Sicilian Defense to victory over his older foe. Here is the score of their fifth game, in which Bobby was equally successful handling the black pieces in the same opening.

Bobby Fischer Soars from Class B Figure (1726 to 2298) Skipping Class A into Master Division

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, October 13, 1957 - Page 44

Fischer Takes N.J. Open
“Bobby Fischer has taken one more title, that of New Jersey Open Champion. He lost no games, but tied with Dr. Mengarini.”

Fischer Takes N.J. Open

The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, October 20, 1957 - Page 37

Fischer vs. Addison
Caro Kann Defense
Deciding game from the US Open in Cleveland, 1957

Fischer vs. Addison

The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Friday, October 25, 1957 - Page 21

“To develop keen minds for the scientific race, the Russians have long advocated the playing of chess. In our own country, Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer, who is only 14, amazes chess experts with his expertness at the game.
In Parade's ‘Only 14, He's a Chess Whiz, but—,’ you'll discover why, although proud of her son, Bobby's mother is not quite happy about his chess triumphs.”

Bobby Fischer amazes chess experts

This article also appears in,

Parade Promos

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Sunday, October 27, 1957 - Page 148 (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)

Only 14, he's a chess whiz, but—

Though Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer amazes chess experts, his mother wants better report cards
by PAUL ABRAMSON

At 14, a local boy named Bobby Fischer is regarded as one of the 20 top chess players in the world. He is the U.S. Open Champion, has been invited to compete at tournaments in Russia and England. “Players with Fischer's ability” says Maurice Kasper, president of the Manhattan Chess Club, “come along only once in a century.”
Yet Bobby Fischer, a boy of exceptional intellect, is the despair of his high-school teachers. Last year, as a freshman, he fell behind in all his subjects, and almost didn't pass. This year the outlook isn't much better. Bobby is a chess whiz, but—
Just why mystifies everyone who knows him. “When he was 7,” says his sister Joan, 19, “Bobby could discuss mathematical concepts like infinity, or do all kinds of trick problems. But ask him to multiply two and two and he'd probably get it wrong.”
This contradiction in Bobby's mental makeup has not made life any easier for his mother, Regina Fischer. Divorced from her husband, she has had to work hard — at present as a registered nurse — to support two children. And between times she's had to scurry from school to school with Bobby.
“When he was in fourth grade,” she says, “I'd already taken him out of six schools, mostly because he didn't like them. Once I entered him in a class for especially bright children. He walked out after the first day.”
“Aware that Bobby is a child prodigy whose talent must be helped to grow, Mrs. Fischer has continued to try to get special training for him. “I've visited university guidance centers and agencies for gifted children,” she says. “Mostly they suggest I enroll him in a small private school, where he would get closer attention. But private schools are expensive.”
“One thing I would suggest,” says a teacher at the public school he attends, “is that Bobby spend more time studying and less time at chess.”
Mrs. Fischer nods helplessly. She feels that to ask that of a boy who won the 1957 Open title, topping all but two of the best players in America, would be rather like asking Mickey Mantle to play less baseball and more mah jongg. Bobby, she says, plays chess even while eating, keeps a board always near his bed to practice on.
Blond and on the thin side, Bobby away from chess is much like any teenager. He's wild about blueberry pie, the Dodgers, baseball, basketball and plaid shirts. He listens to rock 'n' roll records for hours on end. So far, he has shied away from girls and dancing.

$1 and a Rainy Afternoon

He's cocky about his chess. Once he played Samuel Reshevsky, the balding little accountant who's been the king of U.S. chess since 1936. The experienced Reshevsky, 46, polished off Bobby, then 13, with little trouble. But afterwards he told a bystander: “The boy is brilliant; he'll go far.” Bobby, meanwhile, was pointing out to anyone who would listen how Reshevsky had missed moves that would have ended the game sooner.
What amazes old chess hands is that Bobby has been playing the complex game less than eight years. His sister Joan had bought a $1 set to while away a rainy afternoon; she and her 6-year-old brother played a few games, but he was only mildly interested. Two years later he walked into the Brooklyn Public Library — he's a voracious reader — and saw Max Pavey, an international chess master, standing inside a rectangle and playing as many as 20 matches at once.
The curious Bobby sat down at a board and made a move. A few minutes later Pavey had forgotten about the other players and was concentrating hard on beating Bobby. He did, but it took him 15 minutes — a long time for an international master against an 8-year-old who'd player only a few games in his life.
A teacher of chess, Carmen Nigro, witnessed the game. Impressed, he offered to teach Bobby. Within a few years Bobby was beating Nigro regularly. By 1956, now a member of the Manhattan Chess Club, he had tied for fourth in the U.S. Open and won the National Junior Championship — the youngest titleholder in history.
This glittering record earned him a bid to the Lessing J. Rosenwald tournament, the top test of U.S. chess to which only six to 12 of the top players are invited. He was beaten several times — but, playing against the only man in the tournament to defeat Reshevsky, Bobby won.
“I never saw any game played better,” says refereee Hans Kmoch. “It was the game of the century.”
Bobby finished eighth in the tournament, but won the coveted prize for billiancy. Among those finishing behind him was Max Pavey, his library opponent of seven years earlier.
Last summer Bobby scored his greatest triumph, winning the U.S. Open Chess championship at Cleveland. He defeated the best American players with the exception of Reshevsky and Larry Evans, neither of whom competed. In the next few months, some experts believe, Bobby may prove himself the equal of them both.

Money for His Mother

Right now, though, he must start doing better in his school work and try to help out his hard-working mother. To make money, he has taken on as many as 30 challengers simultaneously at $1 a challenger. But such games, he says, “don't produce good chess. They're just hard on your feet.”
Recently his chess playing has started to produce bigger dividends. He won $750 for winning the Open, $125 in another tournament. This, he says, will help him toward his goal: the chess championship of the world.
How long will it take him? Says the cocksure Bobby about a crown that some men have spent a lifetime chasing: “I guess maybe 10 years.”

— Parade, October 27, 1957

Only 14, he's a chess whiz, but—Though Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer amazes chess experts, his mother wants better report cards
Only 14, he's a chess whiz, but—Though Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer amazes chess experts, his mother wants better report cards
Only 14, he's a chess whiz, but—Though Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer amazes chess experts, his mother wants better report cards
Only 14, he's a chess whiz, but—Though Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer amazes chess experts, his mother wants better report cards

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, October 27, 1957 - Page 38

Bobby Fischer and Hastings Christmas Congress
Bobby Fischer, America's youngest master and youngest player ever to win one of the two major national titles, will not play for the national championship in New York Dec. 15 to Jan. 5. Bobby made a prior commitment to appear in England's famous Hastings Christmas Congress. Fischer will get his first taste of international play at Hastings and will meet masters from Yugoslavia, Holland, Denmark, Germany, France and England.

Bobby Fischer and Hastings Christmas Congress

Arizona Republic Phoenix, Arizona Sunday, October 27, 1957 - Page 22

Mother Worries About Genius, 14, Who Lives Only For Chess

MANHATTAN (NANA)—What price child prodigy? That question comes to mind regarding 14-year-old Bobby Fischer, an intense, nail-biting youngster now hailed as the youngest chess master in the United States.
When the slender, sandy-haired Bobby won the U.S. open chess championship in Cleveland last August, triumphing over 176 other players, Al Horowitz, editor of Chess Review, remarked, “Nobody in the world could have played better than Bobby on this occasion.”

* * *

AND AT THE Manhattan Chess Club, where Bobby, the youngest member, plays several evenings a week, Hans Kmoch, the club's general manager, said:
“He's so great that he shows the same potential as the immortals Paul Morphy and Jose Capablanca. He may some day become a world champion.”

Bobby lives with his mother and 20-year-old sister in Brooklyn. Mrs. Regina Fischer, his mother, a cheerful-looking visiting nurse, said the young chess genius, a high school sophomore, was precocious even as an infant. In nursery school, she said, he was a whiz at cutouts and other puzzle games.

* * *

AND AT 7, he was a master of magic and card tricks. He was about the same age when he first learned to play chess, having become immediately fascinated when his sister, Joan, brought home a set she had picked up at a notion store. And from then on, he's been practically living with the game.
Mrs. Fischer has long been concerned over her son's total absorption in chess. Outside of a little tennis, which he plays at high school, where his grades are average, he doesn't appear to have any other interest at all, she said.

Mother Worries About Genius, 14, Who Lives Only For Chess

This article also appears in,

The Miami News Miami, Florida Monday, October 28, 1957 - Page 20

Mother Is Worried
Boy's A Chess Master
By Wambly Bald, North American Newspaper Alliance
Manhattan—What price child prodigy?
That question comes to mind regarding 14-year-old Bobby Fischer, an intense, nail-biting youngster now hailed as the youngest chess master in the United States.
When the slender, sandy haired boy won the U.S. open chess championship in Cleveland last August, triumphing over 176 other players, Al Horowitz, editor of Chess Review, was heard to remark, “Nobody in the world could have played better than Bobby on this occasion.”
And at the Manhattan Chess Club, where Bobby, the youngest member, plays several evenings a week, Hans Kmock, the club's general manager said:

“He's so great that he shows the same potential as the immortals Paul Morphy and Jose Capablanca. He may some day become a world champion.”

It was at this club that young Bobby was observed while he sat at one of the tables. He was playing rapid transit, a kind of blitz chess in which moves must be made within 10 seconds. On and on he played, never looking up, constantly biting his nails or drumming his long, thin fingers on the table. “Come on; hurry up and move,” he kept saying to his opponent.
Very shy as well as nervous, he paced restlessly about the room when a reporter talked to him, “All I want to do is play,” he said, and quickly returned to his table.
One of the members said: “He's so sensitive that he used to go off and cry whenever he lost a game. He hates to lose, and we sort of used to baby him around here. But he doesn't cry any more. He's growing up.”
Bobby lives with his mother and 20-year-old sister in Brooklyn. His mother, a cheerful-looking visiting nurse, said the young chess genius, a high school sophomore, was precocious even as an infant. In nursery school, she said, he was a whiz at cutouts and other puzzle games.
And at 7, he was a master of magic and card tricks. He was about the same age when he first learned to play chess, having become immediately fascinated when his sister Joan brought home a set she had picked up at a notion store. And from then on, he's been practically living with the game.
Mrs. Regina Fischer said, “By the time Bobby was 8, I had to take him out of public school and put him in a private school because he was so restless. In the private school he got along fine because teachers understood him and encouraged him to develop his own personality.

Bobby has always been a nonconformist. He likes to wear dungarees and polo shirts because he considers good clothes sissy, and he doesn't like ties. He doesn't even own a tie.”…

Mrs. Fischer has long been concerned over her son's total absorption in chess. Outside of a little tennis, which he plays at high school, where his grades are average, he doesn't appear to have any other interest at all, she said.
“It's chess, chess, chess, from the minute he opens his eyes in the morning” she declared.

Mother Is Worried: Boy's A Chess Master

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, November 03, 1957 - Page 74

Fischer To Hastings
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old champion chess player, had a vexing problem. As a result of his winning the open tournament of the U.S. Chess Federation, he was invited to the Rosenwald Tournament this December, which will decide the U.S. championship.
The problem? Earlier this year Bobby had accepted an invitation to play in Hastings, England, a tournament scheduled during the same period. Here he would meet some of the finest players in Europe, in an event of great prestige. But in his native New York was the prospect of acquiring the American title, and a chance at the world championship.
Unlike most of his chess problems, which he solves himself with uncanny wizardry for his age, Bobby took this one to his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer. She resolved it on the simple basis that he had given his word to England, and there he was to go. He will be much the youngest participant in Hastings, as he has been in a number of tournaments at home.

Fischer To Hastings

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, November 07, 1957 - Page 58

Chess Entries Listed
Bisguier, Reshevsky Among 14 in U.S. Title Event
Maurice J. Kasper, chairman of the joint committee arranging for the United States championship, which has been coupled this year with the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy competition, Dec. 17-Jan. 8, last night released the list of competitors.
The list of fourteen players includes Arthur B. Bisguier, defending champion; Samuel Reshevsky, five-time holder of the title, and Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old national open champion. The Frank J. Marshall trophy will also go to the winner.
Financed by the American Chess Foundation, the thirteen rounds will be contested at the Manhattan Chess Club.
The other players are Hans Berliner, Washington, and Robert Byrne, Arnold S. Denker, Larry Evans, Arthur Feuerstein, George Kramer, William Lombardy, Edmar Mednis, Herbert Seidman, James T. Sherwin and Abe Turner, all of New York.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1957

Lubbock Evening Journal, Lubbock, Texas, Tuesday, November 12, 1957 - Page 2

Bobby Fischer as Second Alternate
“…the 14-year-old boy wonder of chess, Bobby Fischer of New York City,…”

Bobby Fischer as Second Alternate

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, November 17, 1957 - Page 65

Fischer debates on Hastings vs. U.S. Tourney
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old Open champion of the U.S. Chess Federation. […] Fischer evidently changed his mind, after having chosen to play in Hastings, Eng., rather than the U.S. tourney.

Fischer debates on Hastings vs. U.S. Tourney

The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, November 17, 1957 - Page 45

Sicilian Defense: R.T. Cardoso vs. Bobby Fischer
Third game of the recent match between the Philippine and USA junior champs.

Sicilian Defense: R.T. Cardoso vs. Bobby Fischer

The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle Milwaukee, Wisconsin Friday, November 22, 1957 - Page 6

SPORTS WORLD By Harold U. Ribalow
More on Bobby Fischer, the U.S. Chess Marvel

When 14-year-old Bobby Fischer won the United States Open Chess Championship, many American newspapers and magazines that pay no attention at all to chess suddenly got busy and began to check up on the young master of the chessboard. “Life” magazine devoted a picture spread to him and the “New Yorker,” under the title of “Prodigy” yielded him a couple of pages.
And from all these stories we learn the following:
Nobody ever won a major title at so early an age as 14-year-old Bobby. He will, as a result of his new fame, participate in the Hastings, England tournament, always a top show in the chess world, and, finally, he is expected to visit the Soviet Union to show off his wizardry to a people even more farther advanced in chess than they are in space satellites.

Taught by Older Sister

And there is a great deal more:
Bobby was 6 when he first was taught the game by his older sister and at 9 he entered his first tournament, twice winning the U. S. Junior Chess Championship. A year ago, the “New Yorker” reports, he won the brilliancy prize in the Lessing J. Rosenwald Tournament in New York and the “Chess Review” called the effort “the game of the century.”
The new chess hero is in his second year at Erasmus High School in Brooklyn and is a good but by no means brilliant student. His teachers are amazed he sits still for as long as he does while playing chess, for “in my class” one of them declared, “Bobby couldn't sit still for five minutes.”
Now that he has done so remarkably well, his mother, who used to regret his obsession for the game, is now reconciled to his becoming a professional. Most chess pros starve if they depend solely on chess, and Bobby Fischer, who seems well on his way to accomplishing fantastic things in the chess world, would be well advised to learn something besides mastery of the ancient game, if he wants to eat regularly, that is.

More on Bobby Fischer, the U.S. Chess Marvel

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, December 05, 1957 - Page 20

Bobby Fischer is going to play in the U.S. Championship after all, and not going to England to participate in the annual Hastings tournament.
The youthful American open champion had promised to go to Hastings some months before the year-end dates were set for the U.S. Championship, which conflict with the English event. Having promised, he felt obliged to honor his commitment. However, that familiar bugaboo of American chess—lack of funds—reared its head. With money to travel to England unavailable, Bobby instead has agreed to play in our own tournament.

Bobby Fischer in U.S. Championship

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, December 08, 1957 - Page 48

North Central Open
Stephan Popel of Detroit, resident of this country for only slightly more than a year, emerged as the winner of the 1957 North Central Open in Milwaukee last weekend. He topped a strong field, including National Open Champion Bobby Fischer (6th)…

North Central Open

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 09, 1957 - Page 42

Fischer Turns Back Feuerstein In Chess
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 14-year-old national open chess champion, yesterday defeated Arthur Feuerstein at the Manhattan Chess Club in the first game of the tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy.
Fischer had the white pieces in a Sicilian defense, wherein both castled on the king's side of the board. While Feuerstein advanced his pawn from the queen's side, Fischer drove his king's rook's pawn, first to the fifth and then to the sixth rank, creating a break in the black pawn line.
The open champion retained the initiative as the struggle turned into a skirmish of the four knights. Finally, after an exchange of pawns, which left one of the black rooks stranded awkwardly, Fischer obtained control of the open queen's file.
At that stage the boy had a distinct advantage in position. Both became pressed for time and had to make nine moves in five minutes. Fischer retained his advantage, won a piece and scored in forty-four moves.
The score:

Fischer Turns Back Feuerstein In Chess

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, December 12, 1957 - Page 8

Bobby Fischer, First Round Winner in Lessing J. Rosenwald Tournament
The Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy Tournament has begun at New York's Manhattan Chess Club. One of the first-round winners is 14-year-old Bobby Fischer, national open champion, who defeated Arthur Feuerstein in a 44-move Sicilian with Bobby handling the white pieces.

Bobby Fischer, First Round Winner in Lessing J. Rosenwald Tournament

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, December 15, 1957 - Page 48

Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy: Reshevsky Favored, but Fischer, Lombardy and Kalme add to Difficulties
“…However, some of the younger players, notably U.S. Open and U.S. Junior champion Bobby Fischer…”

Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy: Reshevsky Favored, but Fischer, Lombardy and Kalme add to Difficulties

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, December 19, 1957 - Page 6

Bobby Fischer, First Round Match
“Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old open champion, played his first round match ahead of the rest of the field and won it from Arthur Feuerstein.”

Bobby Fischer, First Round Match

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, December 20, 1957 - Page 38

Sicilian Defense: Bobby Fischer Vs. Herbert Seidman
“Another exciting contest involved Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old national open champion, and Herbert Seidman in a Sicilian defense adopted by Fischer. Endeavoring to force the fighting, Seidman castled on the queen's side of the board and offered the sacrifice of a knight, which was accepted.
Fischer's forces were massed on the queen's side of the board. Seidman dominated the king's file with two rooks and a king, but Fischer castled into safety.
Fischer drew with Seidman in twenty-eight moves by perpetual check.

Sicilian Defense: Bobby Fischer Vs. Herbert Seidman

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, December 21, 1957 - Page 31

Bobby Fischer and Hans Berliner Tied
“ It was Sherwin's second victory and his score of 2-0 topped those of the defending champion, Arthur B. Bisguier, Bobby Fischer of New York and Hans Berliner of Washington, who were tied at 1½-½.

Bobby Fischer and Hans Berliner Tied

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, December 22, 1957 - Page 42

Fischer Wins First In U.S. Championship
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 14-year-old open champion of the U.S. Chess Federation, defeated Arthur Feuerstein of New York in the first game of the U.S. Championship Tournament, which also involves possession of the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy. In this game, which was played before the official opening of the tournament, Fischer had the initiative throughout. He emerged a piece ahead after a time scramble toward the end.

Fischer Wins First In U.S. Championship

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 22, 1957 - Page 102

Roster of Winners of Individual or Team Championships During 1957
Men's Open—Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn

Roster of Winners of Individual or Team Championships During 1957

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 22, 1957 - Page 104

Chess
Russia maintained supremacy on nearly all fronts in the struggle for chess supremacy. Only the junior championship escaped the Russians. It was held in Toronto and won by William Lombardy of New York, a City College student, with a clean score of eleven victories.
Two Soviet grandmasters played for the individual championship of the world. The title changed hands as Vassily Smyslov defeated Mikhail Botvinnik, champion since 1948, by 12½—9½.
Mme. Olga Rubtsova won the women's world championship and a Russian pair finished as winners of the first women's team tournament in the Netherlands. Russia was also successful in the international students' tournament in Iceland.
Two zonal tournaments in the three-year series for the world's championship were held in Europe. Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia, Pal Benko of Hungary and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia qualified at Dublin. At Sofia, Dr. Miroslav Filip of Czechoslovakia was first and B. Sliwa of Poland, A. Matanovic of Yugoslavia and O. Neikrich of Bulgaria were in a triple tie for second place, requiring a play-off.
In this country Samuel Reshevsky, international grandmaster, again was the outstanding performer. He won the annual tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy, sponsored by the American Chess Foundation. He was the victor also in two matches of ten games each. He beat Arthur B. Bisguier, the United States champion, 6—4, and Donald Byrne of Ann Arbor, Mich., 7—3.
The year's sensation was Bobby Fischer, a 14-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy. He successfully defended his title for the national junior championship in San Francisco and, shortly afterward, entered the annual open championship of the United States Chess Federation in Cleveland.
In view of earlier accomplishments, much was expected of him, even though the field, 175, was unusually large. To the amazement of all concerned, the boy, after a tie with the United States champion, Bisguier, was declared to be the winner of the open title.

Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 23, 1957 - Page 34

Fischer vs. Bernstein and Reshevsky
“Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old national open champion, resorted to his favorite Sicilian defense against Sidney Bernstein, champion of the Marshall Chess Club. Both played in energetic style, out Fischer set in motion a well-directed attack against the white king, which was driven to the edge of the board. After forty moves they adjourned with Fischer in the ascendancy.

Fischer, Reshevsky Adjourn
Fischer and Reshevsky adjourned early this morning after a five-hour session of forty-one and a half moves. A draw appeared likely.

Fischer vs. Bernstein and Reshevsky

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, December 24, 1957 - Page 25

Fischer Defeats Bisguier In Chess; Boy, 14, Downs Defender in 41 Moves to Take Second Place in U.S. Title Event
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old national open chess champion, last night defeated Arthur B. Bisguier, the defender, in the United States title tournament in forty-one moves at the Manhattan Chess Club.
The remarkable boy expert, a student at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, moved up into second place, half a point below James T. Sherwin, who retained his position in the lead with 4—1 by winning from Atilio Di Camillo of Philadelphia in thirty-nine moves. The latter overstepped the time limit.
Bisguier, playing black, resorted to the French defense and castled on the queen's side of the board. Fischer castled on the opposite side two moves later and then set out to build up a strong attack against the black king.
For a time Bisguier was able to defend himself, but the unremitting attack of a white knight finally broke up his position and he was forced to resign.
Sherwin had the black side of a Sicilian defense. He had Di Camillo on the run when the former Philadelphia champion lost sight of his clock and was counted out.
Samuel Reshevsky also played the Sicilian defense against Herbert Seidman, who held his own until adjournment after forty-two moves. Each had six pawns, a queen, a knight and two bishops. Reshevsky controlled the king's file. It was the only adjourned game of the fifth round.
Edmar Mednis, who defeated Al Turner in a Ruy Lopez lasting forty-eight moves, placed third in the standing with a score of 3½—1½. He was followed by William Lombardy with 3—2. Lombardy won from George Kramer in a Reti opening after twenty-four moves. Arnold S. Denker, scoring his second consecutive victory, won from Hans Berliner of Washington in a Benoni Counter Gambit after thirty-five moves. Sidney Bernstein was a winner in fifty-one moves against Arthur Feuerstein in a King's Indian defense.

Fischer Defeats Bisguier In Chess; Boy, 14, Downs Defender in 41 Moves to Take Second Place in U.S. Title Event

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, December 25, 1957 - Page 40

14 In Title Chess Get 2-Night Rest
The fourteen players in the United States championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club rested last night and will do so again tonight.
Five rounds have been contested, with five games unfinished. These will be played off Friday. The sixth round is scheduled for tomorrow from 6:30 to 11:30 P.M.
Samuel Reshevsky, with a score of 2—0, is behind in his schedule with a postponed game from the first round with Atilio DiCamillo of Philadelphia and adjourned games with Bobby Fischer and Herbert Seidman, in both of which he has good positions.

14 In Title Chess Get 2-Night Rest

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, December 26, 1957 - Page 36

U.S. Title Chess Resumes Tonight
After an interval of two days, play will be resumed tonight in the United States championship chess tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Seven games of the sixth round will be staged. The five-hour session will start at 6:30 o'clock.
James T. Sherwin is setting the pace with a score of 4—1, with Bobby Fischer close at his heels with 3½—½. Of the five adjourned games pending, most of which will be played off tomorrow, Reshevsky has three—with Di Camillo in the first round, Fischer in the second and Seidman in the fifth. Di Camillo has two additional unfinished games, with Bernstein from the second and Berliner from the fourth.

U.S. Title Chess Resumes Tonight

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, December 27, 1957 - Page 14

Fischer Plays Well
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old national open champion, was kept busy throughout the five-hour session by Hans Berliner of Washington, who, playing against a King's Indian defense, castled on the queen's side of the board.
As usual, the brilliant schoolboy played energetically, advancing his king's pawn early. They reached a queen ending by midnight, at which time the issue was still in doubt.

Fischer Plays Well

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, December 28, 1957 - Page 11

Samuel Reshevsky took the lead in the United States chess championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club yesterday when he won his adjourned fifth-round game with Herbert Seidman in sixty-one moves.
The international grand master had a favorable position when play was resumed and gradually exploited his advantage until Seidman's resignation was forced.
Reshevsky, who has one more unfinished game to play, with Bobby Fischer, paces the field with a score of 4—0.
Fischer, a fourteen-year-old Brooklyn boy who holds the national open chess championship, drew an adjourned sixth-round game with Hans Berliner of Washington last night in fifty-seven moves. Fischer, with a score of 4—1, tied James T. Sherwin for second place.
The seventh round is scheduled for 2 o'clock this afternoon.

Bobby Fischer at Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy Tournament

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 29, 1957 - Page 107

Fischer Annexes Lead In U.S. Chess
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old national open chess champion from Brooklyn, gained the lead in the United States title tournament last night in the seventh round at the Marshall Chess Club.
In lifting his score to 5—1 the youngster administered the first defeat to James T. Sherwin, who for five rounds had set the pace. Sherwin, with 4—2, tied Edmar Mednis in fourth place, while William Lombardy, winning from Al Turner, took the second spot. The best score, however, is that of Samuel Reshevsky, who has 4—0.
Sherwin, with the black pieces, set up a Sicilian defense against which the open champion proceeded energetically after castling on the king's side of the board. Sherwin followed suit at his fourteenth turn and, with 16 Kt-Q5, Fischer offered the temporary sacrifice of a knight.
Queen Moved 3 Times
Complications began to set in and Sherwin was obliged to move his queen three times. Occupying the open QB file, Fischer increased his initiative. He posted his king's bishop strongly and then proceeded to capture two wing pawns. His thirtieth move contributed much to the intricacies in which Fischer's king's bishop played a destructive part.
The constant threat of check by discovery decided the issue in his favor after thirty-six moves.

Fischer Annexes Lead In U.S. Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 30, 1957 - Page 34

Reshevsky Fails In Chess Attack
“…Reshevsky, in third place with a mark of 4—0, is the only player in the tournament who has not been beaten or tied. Bobby Fischer leads at 5—1 and William Lombardy is second at 4½—2½.

Fischer, the 14-year-old national open champion from Brooklyn, and Reshevsky have an adjourned game to complete.”

Reshevsky Fails In Chess Attack

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, December 31, 1957 - Page 28

Fischer Widens U.S. Chess Lead
Beats Mednis in 39 Moves of Pirc Defense for 7-1 Tally—Reshevsky Adjourns
Bobby Fischer widened his lead in the United States chess championship last night with a victory in thirty-nine moves over Edmar Mednis at the Marshall Chess Club.
Fischer, the 14-year-old national open champion from Brooklyn, has a score of 7—1. Samuel Reshevsky, an international grandmaster, is second in the field of fourteen with 5½—1½.
Mednis, of the host club, resorted to the Pirc defense in the lively encounter.
Fischer castled on the queen's side of the board to evade the advance of the black pawns on the opposite wing. Mednis deferred castling until his nineteenth turn and then endeavored to launch a drive along the open king's file.
Fischer in Retreat
Bobby retreated his king into the corner and found a sound defense by posting his knight on the home square. He then took command and engineered a drive that kept Mednis on the defensive.
A brilliant sacrifice of a rook at his twenty-eighth move created intense excitement since both players were hard-pressed for time. Fischer kept up the pressure and finally cornered the black king after thirty-nine moves.

Fischer Widens U.S. Chess Lead
Newspapers NY Times

1957 “Bobby Fischer Chess” Articles

January 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, January 19, 1957 - Page 33, “Eastern States Open at Washington”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, January 28, 1957 - Page 29, “Max Pavey vs Bobby Fischer”

February 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, February 03, 1957 - Page 160, “Shipman Sets Pace”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, February 18, 1957 - Page 35, “Pavey Gains In Chess”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Ithaca Journal Ithaca, New York Thursday, February 21, 1957 - Page 12, “Brooklyn Schoolboy Hailed As New Chess Prodigy”

    ★ Duplicates ★

  4. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, February 25, 1957 - Page 32, “Eight tied at 4-2; Fischer vs J. Goldsmith”

March 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, March 07, 1957 - Page 48, “Dr. Euwe to Play Here”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, March 10, 1957 - Page 218, “Dr. Max Euwe vs. Bobby Fischer”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, March 11, 1957 - Page 29, “Dr. Euwe Plays Draw”

April 1957

May 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, May 04, 1957 - Page 11, “Dr. Max Euwe Vs. Bobby Fischer at Manhattan Chess Club”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, May 27, 1957, Page 51, “Manhattan vs. Marshall Chess Club”

June 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Daily News New York, New York Tuesday, June 11, 1957 - Page 79, “Chess Star, 14, Invited”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, June 11, 1957 - Page 45, “Brooklyn Boy Is Invited To Play Chess Masters”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, June 14, 1957 - Page 28, “Reshevsky Beats 6 of 10 Foes”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, June 16, 1957 - Page 63, “Manhattan Club Wins”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, June 23, 1957 - Page 72, “Experience Beats Youth”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 23, 1957 - Page 173, “Another Child Prodigy Stirs Chess World: Bobby Fischer, at 14, Hailed as ‘Genius’ in Leap to Fame”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, June 23, 1957 - Page 37, “Child Prodigies In Chess”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, June 27, 1957 - Page 16, “The U.S. Junior Championship”

July 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, July 05, 1957 - Page 21, “Fischer Gains In Chess—Brooklyn Boy Beats Fauber at Milwaukee—Evans Wins”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, July 6, 1957 - Page 13, “Fischer Defeats Elo In 49 Moves; Evans and Byrne Also Notch Second-Round Victories in Western Title Chess”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 11, 1957 - Page 19, “Rapid Rise of Bobby Fischer - Defeat of Samuel Reshevsky”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, July 14, 1957 - Page 148, “Bobby Fischer is Ahead”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, July 14, 1957 - Page 36, “Bobby Fischer and Stephen Sholomson in a Tie”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, July 15, 1957 - Page 26, “Fischer Retains Title”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Daily News New York, New York Thursday, July 18, 1957 - Page 495, “Chess Junket Funds Sought”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, July 20, 1957 - Page 31, “Invitation to Hastings Christmas Tournament”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 25, 1957 - Page 19, “Bobby Fischer at San Francisco”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, July 28, 1957 - Page 49, “Bobby Fischer takes sixth place with 6-2”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, July 28, 1957 - Page 81, “Invitation to Fischer”

August 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 08, 1957 - Page 35, “Seven New Yorkers Victors in Second Round of Open Tourney in Cleveland”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Jim Thorpe Times News, Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, Friday, August 09, 1957 - Page 4, “Bobby Fischer Waits on Visa to Compete With Russian Players”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Friday, August 09, 1957 - Page 37, “Chess Group Asks Soviet Visa Speed”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 10, 1957 - Page 25, “Fischer Tied in Chess Tourney at Cleveland”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 11, 1957 - Page 152, “Two Players Pace Cleveland Chess”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, August 12, 1957 - Page 25, “Half point behind”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Tuesday, August 13, 1957 - Page 14, “2 Tied for First In Chess Tourney”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, August 13, 1957 - Page 44, “National Open Tournament, Bobby Fischer Tied for Second Place”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, August 14, 1957 - Page 31, “U.S. Open Tourney”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Thursday, August 15, 1957 - Page 21, “Boy 14, Leads Chess Tourney”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 15, 1957 - Page 27, “Fischer Captures Lead In U.S. Chess”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, August 15, 1957 - Page 26, “Bobby Fischer Takes Over Lead of U.S. Open Tournament”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 15, 1957 - Page 20, “Boy, 14, Tops Play in Chess Tourney”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Friday, August 16, 1957 - Page 49, “Two Share Lead In U.S. Open: Fischer and Donald Byrne Tied for First Place”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, August 16, 1957 - Page 14, “Donald Byrne Ties Fischer In U.S. Chess”
  16. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Friday, August 16, 1957 - Page 18, “Chess Expert Ponders”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 17, 1957 - Page 12, “Fischer Captures Open Chess Title”
  18. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The News Journal, Wilmington, Delaware, Saturday, August 17, 1957 - Page 8, “U.S. Chess Title Won By Brooklyn Boy, 14”
  19. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Daily Times, New Philadelphia, Ohio, Saturday, August 17, 1957 - Page 26, “New Chess Champ Only 14 Years Old”
  20. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, August 17, 1957 - Page 33, “Bobby Fischer Retained U.S. Junior Title”
  21. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, August 18, 1957 - Page 73, “Byrne And Fischer Tied In Semifinal”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 18, 1957 - Page 34, “Bobby Fischer and National Open”
  23. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Daily Herald, Provo, Utah, Sunday, August 18, 1957 - Page 16, “14-Year-Old Cops U.S. Chess Title”
  24. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Medford Mail Tribune, Medford, Oregon, Sunday, August 18, 1957 - Page 12, “Chess Champion”
  25. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 22, 1957 - Page 25, “Bobby Fischer Becomes New Champion of the United States”
  26. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, August 23, 1957 - Page 15, “Manhattan Chess Club Reception”
  27. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, August 25, 1957 - Page 66, “Fischer Takes Open Event At Cleveland”
  28. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant Hartford, Connecticut Sunday, August 25, 1957 - Page 40, “U.S. Junior Champion and U.S. Open Champion”
  29. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Evening Times, Sayre, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, August 27, 1957 - Page 6, “Sayre Youth, Chess, Bobby Fischer”
  30. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () () (Image) Daily News New York, New York Saturday, August 31, 1957 - Page 59, “Chess Is His Game”

September 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 01, 1957 - Page 111, “Mengarini and Fischer Win”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 2, 1957 - Page 17, “Bobby Fischer and Arthur Feuerstein Tied for Second”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 03, 1957 - Page 33, “Fischer, 14, Takes Jersey Open Chess”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 05, 1957 - Page 5, “Brooklyn Boy of 14 Rising to Prominence”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 07, 1957 - Page 27, “Fischer A Pawn Ahead”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, September 07, 1957 - Page 22, “14 Year Old Wins U.S.A. Open”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, September 08, 1957 - Page 54, “Fischer and Lombardy Capture Titles”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, September 08, 1957 - Page 30, “Bobby Fischer, Victor at Cleveland”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 08, 1957 - Page 51, “United States Open Champion”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 08, 1957 - Page 233, “Fischer Defeats Cardoso In Chess: Brooklyn Youth Triumphs in Second Game of Series Here After 31 Moves”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 09, 1957 - Page 34, “Cardoso Sets Back Fischer In 40 Moves”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 12, 1957 - Page 52, “Bobby Fischer Vs. R.T. Cardoso, Manhattan Chess Club”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 15, 1957 - Page 252, “Fischer Gains 2-1 Lead”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, September 15, 1957 - Page 42, “Bobby Fischer, U.S. Junior Champion Becomes Youngest Player to Win U.S. Open”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 16, 1957 - Page 36, “Fischer Chess Victor; Beats Cardoso in 36 Moves to Raise Lead to 4-1”
  16. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 19, 1957 - Page 5, “Bobby Fischer at U.S. Open: Game that Gave Bobby Fischer His Victory”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, September 19, 1957 - Page 17, “Hastings Congress”
  18. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, September 22, 1957 - Page 71, “Fischer Wins In Jersey : Fischer Cardoso Match”
  19. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Daily News New York, New York Sunday, September 22, 1957 - Page 767, “Youth On The Ball”
  20. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 23, 1957 - Page 34, “Chess Test Adjourned: Fischer, Cardoso Are Even After Forty Moves”
  21. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 26, 1957 - Page 5, “Bobby Fischer Compared to Morphy, Capablanca and Reshevsky”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, September 29, 1957 - Page 43, “Fischer Clinches Match”
  23. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 29, 1957 - Page 66, “Quite A Little Bit Is Being Made of Bobby Fischer”

October 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, October 03, 1957 - Page 46, “Bobby Fischer Soars from Class B Figure (1726 to 2298) Skipping Class A into Master Division”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, October 20, 1957 - Page 37, “Fischer vs. Addison”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, October 13, 1957 - Page 44, “Fischer Takes N.J. Open”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Friday, October 25, 1957 - Page 21, “Bobby Fischer amazes chess experts”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () () () () () () (Image) (Image) (Image) (Image) St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Sunday, October 27, 1957 - Page 148, “Only 14, he's a chess whiz, but—Though Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer amazes chess experts, his mother wants better report cards”

    ★ Duplicates ★

  6. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, October 27, 1957 - Page 38, “Bobby Fischer and Hastings Christmas Congress”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Republic Phoenix, Arizona Sunday, October 27, 1957 - Page 22, “Mother Worries About Genius, 14, Who Lives Only For Chess”
  8. (Vague mention of Bobby Fischer, possibly replacing a player in a tournament). () The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, October 27, 1957 - Page 55, “Chess by Isaac Kashdan”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Miami News Miami, Florida Monday, October 28, 1957 - Page 20, “Mother Is Worried: Boy's A Chess Master”

November 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, November 03, 1957 - Page 74, “Fischer To Hastings”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, November 07, 1957 - Page 58, “Chess Entries Listed”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Lubbock Evening Journal, Lubbock, Texas, Tuesday, November 12, 1957 - Page 2, “Chess Tournament Planned At Dallas: Bobby Fischer as Second Alternate”
  4. (Duplicate) () The Ottawa Citizen Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Saturday, November 16, 1957 - Page 30, “Chess Is Only Thing That Matters To Child Prodigy Bobby Fischer”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, November 17, 1957 - Page 65, “Fischer debates on Hastings vs. U.S. Tourney”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, November 17, 1957 - Page 45, “Sicilian Defense: R.T. Cardoso vs. Bobby Fischer”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle Milwaukee, Wisconsin Friday, November 22, 1957 - Page 6, “More on Bobby Fischer, the U.S. Chess Marvel”

December 1957

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, December 05, 1957 - Page 20, “Bobby Fischer in U.S. Championship”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, December 08, 1957 - Page 48, “Bobby Fischer at 1957 North Central Open”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 09, 1957 - Page 42, “Fischer Turns Back Feuerstein In Chess”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, December 12, 1957 - Page 8, “Bobby Fischer, First Round Winner in Lessing J. Rosenwald Tournament”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, December 15, 1957 - Page 48, “Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy: Reshevsky Favored, but Fischer, Lombardy and Kalme add to Difficulties”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, December 19, 1957 - Page 6, “Bobby Fischer, First Round Match”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, December 20, 1957 - Page 38, “Sicilian Defense: Bobby Fischer Vs. Herbert Seidman”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, December 21, 1957 - Page 31, “Bobby Fischer and Hans Berliner Tied”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, December 22, 1957 - Page 42, “Fischer Wins First In U.S. Championship”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 22, 1957 - Page 104, “Chess”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 22, 1957 - Page 102, “Roster of Winners of Individual or Team Championships During 1957”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 23, 1957 - Page 34, “Fischer vs. Bernstein and Reshevsky”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, December 24, 1957 - Page 25, “Fischer Defeats Bisguier In Chess; Boy, 14, Downs Defender in 41 Moves to Take Second Place in U.S. Title Event”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, December 25, 1957 - Page 40, “14 In Title Chess Get 2-Night Rest”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, December 26, 1957 - Page 36, “U.S. Title Chess Resumes Tonight”
  16. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, December 27, 1957 - Page 14, “Fischer Plays Well”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, December 28, 1957 - Page 11, “Bobby Fischer at Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy Tournament”
  18. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 29, 1957 - Page 107, “Fischer Annexes Lead In U.S. Chess”
  19. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 30, 1957 - Page 34, “Reshevsky Fails In Chess Attack”
  20. (Bobby Fischer 1957 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, December 31, 1957 - Page 28, “Fischer Widens U.S. Chess Lead”

Recommended Reading & Charities Selected by Bobby's Supporters

True Torah Jews: Jews Against Zionism Jewish Voice For Peace

Bobby always had mixed feelings about the way Native Americans were unjustly stripped of their land and culture. So charity work in favor of native Americans is something Bobby would probably support.
— Angel Eduardo Lopez

Partnership With Native Americans

We are on Amazon Smile and the link is smile.amazon.com/ch/47-3730147. Thank you.
Partnership With Native Americans

Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess
“Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess”

by Bobby Fischer
Chess Fundamentals by Jose Raul Capablanca
“Chess Fundamentals”

by Jose Raul Capablanca
My 60 Memorable Games by Bobby Fischer
“My 60 Memorable Games”

by Bobby Fischer
Morphy's Games of Chess by Philip Sergeant
“Morphy's Games of Chess”

by Philip Sergeant

Hi there, Just wanna say I'm a chess player and I look up to Bobby Fischer above any other chess player. He was the best and I've even memorised some of his famous games, including the 1972 World Championship match when he defeated Boris Spassky… Fischer also supported Palestine and always spoke out against injustice. He was a good man and I do miss him…”
—“Mo” and “Rico”

Medical Aid Palestine
www.map.org.uk

Medical Aid Palestine, @MedicalAidPal or, @MAPCampaigns